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At present, 56% of young people in each generation start higher education studies. Moving from upper secondary to higher education has slowed down since 2007, and the quota for first-time applicants, implemented in 2016, has strengthened this development. Young people are making calculated choices, fearing that they will make the wrong one – and this results in them not accepting their secondary choice out of fear of losing their first-timer status.

Instead of quotas for first-time applicants, entrance into higher education could be made easier by increasing the number of student places, like Hannu Karhunen suggests in his opinion piece for Helsingin Sanomat on 17 May. However, an increase in student places also requires increasing funding for higher education institutions. To educate an increasing number of students in a high-quality fashion, higher education institutions require not only the reinstitution of the university index but also a significant increase in the level of their basic funding.

Ensuring that higher education institutions have good financial operating conditions is of primary importance, as students need more than just a study right to increase their skills. The best way to ensure the accumulation of skills is quality instruction. In addition to the number of higher education graduates, it is thus extremely important to pay attention to the quality of education, which can be developed by improving learning environments, counselling practices and the ratio of students per teacher. All this requires resources. Higher education institutions should also increasingly cooperate in providing instruction and do this in a manner that is open and flexible from the student’s perspective.

In addition to degree students, instruction should also be provided to lifelong learners. It is important that we provide all citizens with opportunities to educate themselves. Education is especially important now that we have global challenges such as climate change that we need to solve. Besides knowledge, education provides people with understanding and empathy, both of which have a crucial role in building a better world.

Increasing the number of higher education graduates and promoting continuous learning require investments in universities and universities of applied sciences. The new government must look after the quality of education by increasing funding for higher education institutions as well as support the choices of young people by removing the quota for first-time applicants.

Paula Sajaniemi
Chair of the Board
Student Union of Tampere University

Paula Karhunen
Member of the Board in charge of educational policy
Student Union of the University of Helsinki

Master of Laws, Student of Science in Economics and Business Administration, Student of Theology Antti Kähkönen and Student of Biology Sebastian Österman have been selected as the new student representatives to the Board of the University of Helsinki in the Representative Council’s meeting on 16 May 2019. The University Collegium has validated the selection in its meeting on 22 May 2019. The new student representatives will begin their two-year term on the Board of the University on 1 January 2020.

Kähkönen has acted as a member of the University’s Board and the Board’s Audit Committee since January 2018. He was now selected for a second term on the Board. Previously, Kähkönen has acted as a student representative in positions such as the Faculty Council of the Faculty of Law (2013–2015), the University Collegium (2013–2015) and the University’s Quality Management Steering Group (2017). Kähkönen has also been a member of HYY’s Representative Council in 2011–2013. He has also worked as the Secretary General of the Student Union of Hanken School of Economics in 2014–2015 and been a member of the Board of HYY Group (the current Ylva) in 2016–2018.

Before being selected to the Board of the University, Österman has, since 2018, acted as a student representative in positions such as the Faculty Council of the Faculty of Biological and Environmental Sciences, the University Collegium and the University’s sustainability and responsibility committee. Österman has also been a member of HYY’s Representative Council in 2016–2019 and a member of the Student Union’s Board in charge of educational policy, environmental affairs and bilingualism in 2018.

In their speeches at the Representative Council meeting, Kähkönen and Österman emphasised the role of the University’s Board in protecting the University’s values and global responsibility – the Board must look beyond day-to-day politics and quartile economy. One of the most important decisions of the coming two-year term is thus to approve the University’s new strategy, which will determine the University’s direction until 2030.

‘In the University’s new strategy, our goal must be an ecologically, socially and financially sustainable university that uses critical research and teaching to educate curious, responsible and bold citizens who have both the desire and ability to solve difficult societal problems. This way, we can work together as a university to build a better world for tomorrow,’ Kähkönen declares.

The newly chosen members of the Board emphasise that communality within the University must be further strengthened and that the wellbeing of both the staff and students requires investments for the University to be on a sustainable path. Developing the transparency and democratic nature of the University’s decision-making will also help build a university community in which each member can feel they belong.

‘I believe that together we can build a university where the values that emerged during the drafting of our new strategy – truth, education, freedom and communality, as well as the related principles of university democracy, critical thinking and equality – will flow through the structures of our university and be visible in the everyday life of each member of our community,’ Österman envisions.

The Board of the University of Helsinki is the highest decision-making body of the University, with two of its thirteen members being students. The Board makes decisions on the University’s Strategy, operating and financial plans, budget, University Statutes, the operational structure of the University and the number of students accepted into the University. It also tends to the University’s asset management and use, organises accounting and asset management monitoring, approves the University’s performance agreement with the Ministry of Education and Culture as well as any other significant or principled agreements, and issues the University’s statements on major matters of principle. Further information on the University’s Board’s operation is available on the University’s website.


Further information on the selection of members to the University’s Board is given by:

Jenna Sorjonen, specialist in educational policy
jenna.sorjonen@hyy.fi
050 325 5202


Have you already checked your income for 2018? Now is the time to do it.

If you have earned too much in relation to the number of months of student aid you have received, you can still return months of student aid until the end of May with no added interest. If Kela has to collect months of aid from you next year, interest will be added to the collected sum. You can check your income from your tax decision, for instance, and you can check the income limits of student aid here.

Check the credits you have earned in the autumn, too

You can return months of student aid received in the autumn term 2018 until the end of May, and months of aid received in the spring term 2019 until the end of August. Now is the time to check your study progress from the autumn – and remember to take the minimum requirement of 20 credits into account!

If you are returning student aid, do so by 31 May 2019!

You do not need to return general housing allowance

You do not need to return general housing allowance, which is determined based on the average income you have reported. This means that the income limits that are valid for student aid do not concern general housing allowance. The two benefits are not linked to each other. However, you should check your general housing allowance if your income changes.

Further information on returning student aid is available on Kela’s website.

Hannele Kirveskoski
Specialist (subsistence, housing, equality)
050 543 9608
hannele.kirveskoski[a]hyy.fi

Is volunteer work close to your heart? Are you good at inspiring and motivating those around you? Apply to work with us developing our volunteer activities and making it possible for an increasing number of students to participate in them!

We are looking for a project employee to develop HYY’s volunteer activities. As our volunteer coordinator, you will get to look for aspects of our activities that could be improved, to create long-term structures for running our operations and to make the activities inspiring, attractive and rewarding for all of HYY’s numerous volunteers. The coordination and development work of our volunteer activities is conducted in close cooperation with the member of our Board in charge of volunteers.

We expect you to have:

  • An independent approach to work as well as teamwork and problem-solving skills
  • A desire to develop and create new things
  • Project management skills
  • Experience in volunteer work
  • Communication skills
  • Good skills in Finnish, Swedish and English are considered as advantages.

You will get:

  • An interesting and challenging job
  • A salary that is in accordance with the student unions’ collective agreement, with potential bonuses for education and experience
  • Flexible working hours
  • Awesome colleagues

We are:

  • A student union with around 26,000 members
  • An efficient, active and passionate actor in advocacy work as well as a community that enables diverse volunteer activities
  • An enthusiastic work community, consisting of 8 specialists and 12 members of the board among others, that gets things done together in a competent yet relaxed fashion 

The position is fixed term, starting on 12 August 2019, or as agreed, and lasting until 20 December 2019. The working hours are 30 hours per week unless otherwise agreed, and the salary is in accordance with the student unions’ collective agreement, with potential bonuses for education and experience.

HYY emphasises diversity and equality in its activities. We hope to receive as many applications as possible from people with diverse backgrounds.

The application period ends on 10 June 2019. Send your free-form application with your CV attached to hallinto@hyy.fi with ‘Vapaaehtoiskoordinaattori’ as the subject. Possible interviews will be held on Wednesday or Thursday 12–13 June 2019.

Further information is provided by Secretary General Aaro Riitakorpi (0400 816 426), aaro.riitakorpi@hyy.fi.

In its meeting on 21 May 2019, the Financial Committee of the Student Union of the University of Helsinki has decided to remove Helsingin Akateemiset Perussuomalaiset (HAPSU; ‘Helsinki academic Finns Party’) from HYY’s organisation register.

On 4 March 2019, HAPSU released a statement titled ‘Suomen yliopistojen kuuluukin tuntua suomalaisilta’ (‘Finnish universities should feel Finnish’). HYY’s Financial Committee decided to process the case because it suspected that HAPSU’s actions had been in violation of HYY’s Equality Plan and that HAPSU had thus also violated the rules for organisations operating under HYY. HAPSU was asked to submit a written clarification on the matter, and they were also heard in the Financial Committee’s meeting on 10 April. Based on HAPSU’s statement and the hearing, the Financial Committee concluded that the association is not committed to HYY’s equality policies and that, based on the hearing, HAPSU has no intention to alter its operations to adhere to the policies. For these reasons, the Financial Committee decided to remove HAPSU from under the Student Union.

Removing an organisation from under HYY means that the organisation is no longer entitled to use organisational services provided by HYY, such as meeting and festive premises. Organisations that belong to political parties cannot receive HYY’s grants, and HAPSU has not received financial support from the Student Union. Regardless of the decision, members of HAPSU who are also members of the Student Union can still become candidates in HYY’s Representative Council elections and participate in the Student Union’s activities.

According to HYY’s Constitution, HAPSU is entitled to appeal the Financial Committee’s decision to HYY’s Board within 14 days of having been notified of the decision.

Further information:
Aaro Riitakorpi
Secretary General
040 0816 426

The negotiations at Säätytalo are streching overtime. But don’t worry! We’ll help!

Read HYY’s answers to the questions of Antti Rinne, the leader of the preliminary discussions on formingthe government.

We are participating in the student movement’s tradition of following the government negotiations: bit.ly/päivystys.

1. A carbon-neutral Finland that protects biodiversity

a. Are you committed to the goal of stopping global warming to 1.5 degrees? Are you committed to having Finland be carbon neutral by 2035 and become carbon negative rapidly afterwards?
b. What kind of measures do you think the mitigation of climate change requires on different sectors of society?
c. What measures do you consider central in protecting and improving biodiversity?

Climate change is the greatest challenge of our era. We should also remember that it is, first and foremost, a generational issue and, as such, one of HYY’s three main themes in the parliamentary elections. If global warming cannot be stopped in time, students will not have a future world for which all other political decisions are made.

HYY is committed to stopping global warming to 1.5 degrees. HYY ambitiously wants Finland to already achieve carbon neutrality by 2030 and become carbon negative afterwards. HYY points out that these goals require structural political decisions: the tax and aid systems of our society must swiftly be changed for them to protect the environment, Finland must advocate for ambitious climate policy in the European Union, and climate and environmental education must be established as part of the curricula at all levels of education. HYY is committed to the UN’s Agenda 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, which also include themes related to climate and biodiversity.

2. Finland is larger than its size in the world

a. How should the European Union be developed? What are the central goals for Finland’s EU Presidency?
b. Do you accept the goal of increasing Finland’s development cooperation appropriations to 0.7 per cent of gross national income? In what time frame do you consider it possible to achieve this?

HYY, together with SYL, wants to ensure that the voice of students and young people is heard in the European Union’s decisions. For instance, the presence of students in the decision-making process must be ensured in the planning of the European Education Area (EEA). The current methods of hearing young people (such as the EU Youth Dialogue) must also be linked as parts of political processes.

Besides the participation of young people, one of the most important issues to develop in the EU is the appreciation of education in Europe. To improve this, the student movement demands the creation of a position for an education, research and innovation commissioner. Internationality and mobility must be genuinely accessible parts of educational paths all over Europe. To ensure this, funding for Erasmus, Europe’s programme for education, must be tripled, and each EU country must commit themselves to investing at least 2 per cent of their GDP in higher education. In its future multiannual financial frameworks, the EU must invest more in research, education and lifelong learning.

HYY demands that Finland uses at least 0.7% of its GDP in development cooperation as per the UN’s recommendations. As a pioneer, HYY is already using a corresponding share of its annual budget for the same purpose.

3. A safe Finland governed by the rule of law

a. Describe your views on Finland as governed by the rule of law and state your methods for strengthening this. How would you promote the realisation of human rights in Finland? What measures are you ready to take in order to develop the status of national languages in Finland?

The most acute human rights issue in Finland is the Trans Act, which is a violation of human dignity. HYY demands that a comprehensive reform of the Trans Act is made immediately and that the new Trans Act must be in accordance with Trasek’s recommendations. In addition to this, Finland must legally recognise a third gender, and personal identity codes must be made gender neutral.

In addition to the Trans Act, HYY advocates for lowering the age limit for sterilisation and for its free availability for those over 25 years of age, for making military service gender neutral, for abandoning prison sentences for total objectors, for making non-military service the same length as military service, for free contraception for everyone under the age of 25 and for having an individual’s personal choice be sufficient grounds for the termination of pregnancy.

The household-based nature of general housing allowance must be abandoned, as people living together have no legal obligation to provide maintenance for each other without the existence of a marriage. In addition to this, applicants are in unequal positions compared to each other with regard to the decisions they have received due to the insufficient instructions Kela has been given.

The policy decision that students are not entitled to summertime social assistance without taking out their student loan is contrary to people’s sense of justice. Students are the only group of people in Finland that is forced to get into debt for their basic subsistence. Loans are not a part of social security.

4. A dynamic Finland

a. Do you believe that Finland can build itself new, sustainable and export-oriented growth through the solutions to climate change and other megatrends? Do you think it is necessary to create a shared strategy for Finland to secure a strengthening vitality and economic growth based on sustainable development? What would be the key points of such a strategy?
b. What kind of measures should be used to develop the metropolitan area, growing urban areas, regional centres and rural areas?
c. How would you ensure the maintenance and development of Finland’s traffic infrastructure? What is your model for developing its funding?

HYY believes that the long-term solutions to both climate change mitigation and employment are born out of investing in education and research. When discussing climate change, however, we should remember that this alone is not enough – we also need quicker solutions. The mitigation of climate change must not be overshadowed by economic interests.

The importance, growth and unique needs of the metropolitan areas must be identified and acknowledged. HYY’s students are especially affected by the housing problem of the Capital Region. HYY, together with the World Student Capital association, conducts active advocacy work towards the cities of the Capital Region in order to increase housing production. As for the state, HYY demands that it takes bold measures to make the prices of rental apartments reasonable all around the country. Increasing housing production must be made easier by concrete decisions such as abandoning the construction norm for civil defence shelters.

Finland must commit itself to the maintenance and development of public transport infrastructure. HYY especially wishes to see investments in climate-friendly rail transport both between and within cities. In the Capital Region, it is particularly important to develop cross-city light rail transit that would link campuses together. Public transport must be accessible both physically and economically for it to act as an attractive alternative to private cars.

5. A Finland of trust and an equal labour market

a. How would you reform family leaves?
b. What are the central measures you would take to achieve pay equality between women and men?

HYY demands that family leaves are reformed according to the so-called ‘6+6+6’ model, so that the leaves would be more evenly distributed between the parents.

Gender segregation in education in Finland, starting with educational background, is among the highest in Europe. Together with the student movement, HYY demands that the state creates a separate programme on equality in education to promote the accessibility of higher education and that this programme takes the gender perspective into account.

7. A just, equal and participatory Finland

HYY’s answers on developing subsistence and reducing inequality are included in our answers to other questions.

8. A Finland of competence, education and innovations

a. Do you acknowledge that investments must be made in education, research, innovations and infrastructure in order to strengthen the foundation of sustainable economic growth? Describe your measures in concrete terms.
b. Do you acknowledge the need for each entire age group to complete an upper secondary level degree at a minimum? Describe the measures you would take to achieve this.
c. How would you ensure that everyone continues to learn and develop their skills throughout their career?
d. How would you promote the status of culture in Finland?

HYY believes that investing in education and research is key not only to Finland’s economic success but also to saving the world. Higher education institutions do valuable work that will help us find the solutions to challenges that concern the entire humankind, such as climate change.

The new government must take measures to ensure that higher education institutions are able to conduct high-quality research and educational work. To do this, the higher education institutions need resources. HYY demands that the university index is in effect for the entire government term. In addition to implementing the university index, resources must be allocated to higher education institutions by increasing their basic public funding.

Besides financial investments, attention must be paid to the way in which the resources are distributed to the higher education institutions. The funding model must be modified in such a way that ensures higher education communities are able to work in peace. The role of performance management – large by international standards – must be reduced, and researchers must be allowed to focus on their research instead of making funding applications. We must remember that research and educational work are long-term activities where easy wins are not available.

HYY thinks that the government must not only make the necessary financial investments in higher education institutions but also promote the accessibility of education. A programme on equality in education must be created to promote the accessibility of higher education.

The best way to promote accessibility is to have free education. HYY demands that higher education that leads to a degree is kept free and that the tuition fees for students from outside the EU and EEA countries are removed. Free education is also the best solution for having the entire age group complete at least an upper secondary level degree. Having free secondary-level studies also guarantees that everyone has equal opportunities to undertake further studies.

Accessibility is an important perspective on lifelong learning, as well. Learning new things and developing one’s skills must be possible for absolutely everyone. For this reason, the financial responsibility for continuous learning must not be placed on the individual. Sufficient resources for higher education institutions make it possible for them to offer accessible education, such as open university studies, for as many as possible.

The student movement has a unique status in Finnish culture. HYY holds both student and other culture in high esteem. The state must ensure that different forms of culture, such as art museums, music events and theatre, are accessible to students from a financial viewpoint, too. Young people must be acknowledged as both consumers and producers of culture.

9. Comprehensive reform of the social security system

The comprehensive reform of the social security system will take several election terms. Are you willing to combine different benefits and accept a unified level for benefits awarded on different grounds in such a way that the reform would increase employment, raise the level of education, reduce poverty and inequality, and improve participation?

The social security system must be extensively reformed for it to reflect the changed operating environment of our society. HYY’s view is that the best way to reform social security is to have a gratuitous basic income that is paid every month to all individuals of age who are covered by Finnish social security. The basic amount of basic income must ensure sufficient basic security. In addition to the basic amount, additional means-tested aid may also be granted.

Everyone, especially young people, must have the opportunity to try and sometimes fail, to experiment and to seek their own career path. Basic income creates the security that makes it possible for people to study, act as an entrepreneur, employ themselves, and accept short and occasional work. Failures and setbacks should not be punishable – instead, people facing them should be offered support.

At the legislative stage, an extensive evaluation of generational impact must be made. The status and agency of young people in society must be strengthened, and the trend of increasing inequality must be stopped.

The basic income experiment carried out in 2017–2018 must be continued and expanded to cover a larger group, for instance, students. The tentative results of the experiment already tell us that the recipients of basic income considered that their wellbeing had improved and trust increased. Basic income did not make people passive, nor did it reduce their willingness to participate in the measures of the labour administration. These results are encouraging and give reason to continue the experiment.

In the long term, Finland should entirely move to basic income, but as an immediate measure to improve the subsistence of students, an increase of one hundred euros per month must be made to the study grant. General housing allowance must be made personal so that the income of one’s partner does not affect the amount of allowance.

10. State your starting point for reforming social welfare and healthcare.

As a whole, HYY is satisfied with the fact that the new act on higher education students’ health care put an end to the uncertainty over the FSHS’s future. We also gladly welcome the fulfilment of the student movement’s long-standing goal, equal healthcare. Now that the structures are in working order, it is time to develop the content. Mental health services, for instance, are in need of improvements, and the role of psychotherapy in the FSHS’s services must be clarified.

Due to the social and healthcare reform, the FSHS’s services and the social work and health services organised by municipalities and counties will also have to be reconciled. In this way, no student would fall through the net simply because student healthcare does not provide social services. In addition to this, sufficiently wide-ranging services in fields not covered by the FSHS must also be guaranteed for students. Investments must be made in the services of gynaecologists and dermatologists in particular, as they will no longer be included among the services offered by the FSHS. In health policy, HYY is particularly worried about the mental health of students and the resources for mental health services.

More information:
Anna Lemström
anna.lemstrom@hyy.fi

If you will be studying during the summer, the time to apply for student aid for the summer months is right now. Student aid includes the study grant and student loan in the summer, too. Summer studies do not affect the paying of general housing allowance. Please note, however, that if you have income from your summer job or your housing situation changes, we recommend applying for a review of the housing allowance. All of the above can easily be done through Kela’s eServices (only in Finnish or Swedish).

If you are still without a summer job despite trying to get one and have not found sensible summer studies either, you can apply for basic social assistance from Kela during the summer. Please note that Kela currently requires students to have their student loan disbursed for the entire academic year before applying for basic social assistance if their studies continue in the autumn. The practice regarding this may have varied before, but Kela has now specified it, which means that student loans that have not been but can be disbursed are now considered as income.

Justify the lack of sensible studies carefully so that the person processing your application can understand your situation even if they are unfamiliar with the issue. Your application should also state which jobs you have applied for.

Further information on basic social assistance for students can be found here.

In case you need social assistance for the summer months and are going to receive a tax refund, remember to take the refund’s potential effect on August’s social assistance into account. Tax refunds are now paid to most people in August. The tax refunds are considered as income when applying for social assistance, unless Kela considers the refund insignificant. In practice, this refers to a tax refund of €50 per person or €100 per family. When applying for social assistance, only the part of the tax refund that exceeds these sums is taken into account. In other words, if you receive a €70 tax refund, only €20 is taken into account.

Even after that you can resort to the social services of your municipality to help you out. 

If you live in Helsinki:
https://www.hel.fi/helsinki/en/socia-health/socia-support/income-support/

In Espoo:
https://www.espoo.fi/en-US/Social_and_health_services/Social_Welfare_and_Income_Support

In Vantaa:
https://www.vantaa.fi/health_care_and_social_services/social_support_and_social_assistance/subsistence

Also Ohjaamo Helsinki in Kamppi (Fredrikinkatu 48) helps 15–29-year-olds to find solutions in tricky circumstances: http://ohjaamo.hel.fi/

More information:
Hannele Kirveskoski, specialist
050 543 9608
hannele.kirveskoski@hyy.fi

Epic, surprising, touching, hilarious or dazzling? What kind of an anniversary do you think HYY should have? Should there be confetti, sparkles or perhaps some alpacas? Are you a party planning pro? If so, become our anniversary master!

HYY’s anniversary is held on Saturday 23 November, and it will be celebrated in the form of an academic dinner party with an open after-party. The anniversary masters will assemble  an anniversary team, participates in planning both the anniversary and its after-party and be responsible for the practical arrangements of the anniversary. The anniversary masters will be remunerated with a fee of 1000 euros each and a 10% commission on all the sponsors they successfully negotiate for the event. This job requires fluent Finnish or English. You may apply by yourself or straight as a duo with your master buddy.

Please send your free-form application to hallinto@hyy.fi by Sunday, 26 May 2019, by 8 pm. The email should be titled “Anniversary master 2019”. Interviews for the position will be held on 28 May. The anniversary planning and search for sponsors will begin in June according to a mutual agreement.

More information: Arttu Lehtinen, producer, 050 537 2831, arttu.lehtinen@hyy.fi

Do you have a burning desire to develop student organisations’ activities? Are issues related to equality and accessibility close to your heart?

The Student Union of the University of Helsinki (HYY) turns 151 years old this year. With its 26,000 members, it is the largest student union in Finland and has around 250 student organisations operating under it.

We are looking for a full-time project employee to advance HYY’s equality work, with particular focus on student organisation activities. As our project employee, you will get to both develop existing things and create new: you will plan, realise and develop HYY’s equality work together with the specialists and members of the Student Union’s Board in charge of equality. You will get to create new practices and structures for the Student Union to help us improve equality in student organisations and, through them, the entire Student Union.

The project employee’s duties will include drafting equality-themed instructions and materials, organising training sessions for student organisations operating under HYY and communicating about these training sessions. In addition to this, the project employee will get to plan the structures and schedules of future training sessions in relation to the other training sessions aimed at organisations. The position requires familiarity with equality issues, independent approach to work and communication skills. We further appreciate a good command of Swedish and English as well as knowledge of legislation and data protection issues related to equality.

The position is fixed term, starting on 12 August 2019, or as agreed, and lasting until 20 December 2019. It is a full-time position (37.5 h per week) with a salary that is in accordance with the student unions’ collective agreement, with potential bonuses for education and experience.

HYY emphasises diversity and equality in its activities. We hope to receive as many applications as possible from people with diverse backgrounds.

The application period ends at 8.00 pm on Sunday 2 June 2019. Send us your free-form application letter with a maximum length of one page, with your CV attached. Send the application to hallinto@hyy.fi with ‘Projektityöntekijä’ as the subject. Possible interviews will be held on Tuesday or Wednesday 4–5 June 2019.

Further information:
Further information is provided by Secretary General Aaro Riitakorpi (0400 816 426), aaro.riitakorpi@hyy.fi and Specialist Hannele Kirveskoski (050 543 9608), hannele.kirveskoski@hyy.fi.


Have you already checked your income for 2018? Now is the time to do it.

If you have earned too much in relation to the number of months of student aid you have received, you can still return months of student aid until the end of May with no added interest. If Kela has to collect months of aid from you next year, interest will be added to the collected sum. You can check your income from your tax decision, for instance, and you can check the income limits of student aid here.

Check the credits you have earned in the autumn, too

You can return months of student aid received in the autumn term 2018 until the end of May, and months of aid received in the spring term 2019 until the end of August. Now is the time to check your study progress from the autumn – and remember to take the minimum requirement of 20 credits into account!

If you are returning student aid, do so by 31 May 2019!

You do not need to return general housing allowance

You do not need to return general housing allowance, which is determined based on the average income you have reported. This means that the income limits that are valid for student aid do not concern general housing allowance. The two benefits are not linked to each other. However, you should check your general housing allowance if your income changes.

Further information on returning student aid is available on Kela’s website.

Hannele Kirveskoski
Specialist (subsistence, housing, equality)
050 543 9608
hannele.kirveskoski[a]hyy.fi



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